August 20, 2014

How to Solve Rubik’s Cube

Solve Rubik’s Cube in 20 Moves or Less

Finally!!! Someone has given us a chart that show’s exactly how to solve the Rubik’s Cube puzzle game. I remember hating these things as a kid back in the 1980s. I know, I know… Everyone loved these things back then. Everyone except me, that is. You see, there were two kids in my neighborhood that somehow knew how to solve a Rubik’s Cube. And, they swore there was no pattern to it. Well, Hah… This proves them wrong!!!

(Click image to enlarge.)
How to Solve Rubiks Cube in 20 Moves or Less

Rubik’s Cube Facts:

  • Erno Rubik invented the Rubik’s Cube in the Spring of 1974 in the town of Budapest, Hungary.
  • He invented the Cube while trying to find a way to show three-dimensional geometry.
  • The Rubik’s Cube has been one of the best selling toys world-wide since it’s conception.
  • It took Erno himself more than a month to solve the Rubik’s Cube puzzle for the first time.
  • There are many varieties of Rubik’s Cube available today, including: Edible Cubes, Super Mario Brothers themed Cubes, and even MP3 playing Cubes.
  • The world’s largest Rubik’s Cube is in Knoxville, Tennessee. It is 3 meters tall and weighs over 500kg.
  • The Rubik’s Cube toy has inspired an art movement known as “Rubikubism.”
  • The most expensive Rubik’s Cube ever produced is known as the “Masterpiece Cube.” It was created by Diamond Cutters International in 1995 and is valued at $1.5 Million (U.S.). It is a fully-functional, correct size Rubik’s Cube and features 22.5 carats of amethyst, 34 carats of rubies, and 34 carats of emeralds – all set in 18-carat gold.
  • Over 350 million Rubik’s Cubes have been sold worldwide.
  • There is a worldwide competition for solving the Rubik’s Cube in the fastest time. They even have special events where contestants have to use only one hand to solve the Cube or use their feet, instead of their hands. And, there’s a competition where everyone is blindfolded.
  • The current world record for solving the Cube is held Erik Akkersdijk and is 7.08 seconds.
  • There are more than 43 quintillion possible configurations of the Rubik’s Cube.

So, now anyone can solve Rubik’s Cube with this handy chart. Enjoy!!

Source = fixr.com

7 comments

  1. That chart does not show how to solve any rubix cube it just shows 1 cube being solved in 20 moves. Pick up a cube and try it. All the article is saying is any cube can be solved in 20 moves or less.

  2. Actually, Rubik invented the Cube to see if it could be done. It was a personal mechanical challenge. He didn’t realize it was a puzzle until he accidentally scrambled it.

    http://www.puzzlesolver.com/puzzle.php?id=29;page=15

  3. Just tried this most certainly did not work. Maybe I missed something can someone confirm it? Oh and I can solve it fairly easily but it takes about 40 moves.

  4. There are so many possible combinations to the Cube that the 20-move chart is worthless unless you start with a mix that can be solved with that pattern. The best way to work with a cube is to learn which moves do what to which pieces. This is a bit more work, but it allows you to deal with any possible situation. To present this chart as a 20-move solution to a randomly-mixed Rubik’s Cube is leaving out a lot of information, and will only frustrate people.

  5. Watched somebody do this recently in a pub and he even talked me through it, still can’t understand how it’s done!!! Amazing graphic though, will have to check it out with my Rubik’s in the hand.

  6. I have tried this with the same cube 8 times now and it does not even solve one side of the cube. This is a hoax

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